Episode 22: Aliens – Newt’s Tale

Back in Episode 8 I took a look at Dark Horse and their attempts to milk the Predator franchise, now it’s time to take a look at that arch rival of those aliens… the… Aliens… In a story that claims to chronicle the adventures of the young girl from the James Cameron directed sci-fi action classic that was a follow up to the Ridley Scott directed sci-fi horror classic. Those are some pretty hefty boots to fill… let’s see how this does.

Listen to Episode 22: Aliens – Newt’s Tale.

You can subscribe to the Council of Geeks Podcast, home of 90s Comics Retrial on iTunes or on Stitcher.

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Enjoy the cover because it’s all downhill from here.

The cover art you just saw was done by John Bolton. The pages you are about to see were written by Mike Richardson, penciled by Jim Somerville and inked by Brian Garvey.

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Observe the heated debate between Dr. Beardy McDeadeyes and his patient suffering from some kind of horrible malformation of the body and face.

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BANZAI!

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The original design for those boxing nun puppets.

Finally, a reminder that the podcast theme song is by Erica Driesbach,and you can find more of her work at her website right here.

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3 thoughts on “Episode 22: Aliens – Newt’s Tale

  1. I collected Dark Horse’s ALIENS comics for years, and it started with “Newt’s Tale”, specifically, “Newt’s Tale” issue #2. One of my friends got it and we spent hours pouring over the pages, not for the quality of the story but just to revisit scenes from the movie we’d only just discovered that year. It was years before I ever read issue #1, and I remember being disappointed at how little new characterization it actually provided. Still, I remember the miniseries fondly more-or-less for being a partial comic adaptation of James Cameron’s movie.

    Of the many Aliens comics I’ve read, precious few of them evoke any real horror. More often than not, the stories sacrificed the feeling of dread that permeated Scott’s original Alien and a good chunk of Cameron’s sequel in favor of splashy images that allowed the artist to display his mastery of Giger’s xenomorph, or blood-soaked images of gore and viscera. Whether conscious or not, this direction coincided with the late ’80s / early ’90s trends in comics that pushed the Aliens franchise into more of the action-horror genre.

    Also, ALIEN 3 fails only by its comparison to the earlier installments. The story should’ve been divorced from Ripley and Newt, rather than a ham-fisted continuation. David Fincher still manages to display impressive directorial chops and pose great philosophical questions, despite the fact that the script kept changing on him and the executive producers wouldn’t let him own the vision of the film.

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  2. Frank says:

    I have a deep love for Aliens, one of my favorite movies, but no access to a comic until several years into the Dark Horse license. I tried a few series around 1991, and wore a Chris Warner Aliens t-shirt for most of junior high, but nothing clicked for me enough to stick with the comics over the long haul. I remember being tempted by Newt’s Tale since it tied directly into the movie, but my recollection is that this was a squarebound prestige format number with a prohibitive price point.

    Despite the crushing disappointment of losing Newt & Hicks in the first few minutes of my initial theatrical viewing, I’m a defender of Alien3 as a worthy conclusion to the Ripley trilogy. I actually prefer it to Scott’s original movie. There are no other films in this series.

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  3. I love troubled films, and Alien3 is in my Top 5 in that accidental subgenre, loved how you described it. Newt’s Tale seems a not so glorified movie adaptation, I shan’t look into it. I did get a few Aliens books through the 90s, one mini-series with Kelly Jones art, for example, but I wasn’t an avid Aliens (or Predator) fan.

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